Posts Tagged wit

Wit & Wisdom — Mark Twain

28 September 2010

“Do not offer a compliment and ask a favor at the same time. A compliment that is charged for is not valuable.”

“Don’t part with your illusions. When they are gone, you may still exist, but you have ceased to live.”

“Let us endeavor so to live that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.”

“Praise is well, compliment is well, but affection – that is the last and final and most precious reward that any man can win, whether by character or achievement.

“Wrinkles should merely indicate where smiles have been.”

“Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen.”

“Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.”

“What ought to be done to the man who invented the celebrating of anniversaries? Mere killing would be too light.”

“There are women who have an indefinable charm in their faces which makes them beautiful to their intimates, but a cold stranger who tried to reason the matter out and find this beauty would fail.”

“If Christ were here now, there is one thing he would not be – a Christian.”

“I can live for two months on a good compliment.”

“Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.”

“Our consciences take no notice of pain inflicted on others until it reaches a point where it gives pain to us.”

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear.”

“We all live in the protection of certain cowardices which we call our principles.”

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“Mark Twain once attended a dinner party at which the subject of heaven and hell was raised. Throughout the heated discussion Twain said nothing. Finally, the hostess asked, ‘Why haven’t you said something, Mr. Clemens? Surely you must have an opinion on this subject.’

‘Madam, you must excuse me,’ Mark Twain replied. ‘I am silent because of necessity. I have friends in both places.’”